Video Installation Draft Edit:

I made the videos colour have that cinematic look by changing the colour correction, contrast and three way colour in the adobe premiere. I want it to have that professional cinematic effect and have that darkish mood into it by increasing the contrast. Changing the colours made creates stronger tension of the slow-motion effect and how the story unfolds. The mood to it suits with the story as the story is about regrets, wrong decisions and violence.

Dark colours = Strange videos

Screen Shot 2015-06-12 at 00.00.14

Screen Shot 2015-06-11 at 23.59.54

Screen Shot 2015-06-12 at 00.13.51Screen Shot 2015-06-12 at 00.13.13

As you can see the original video and the edited version is completely different from each other. The edited looks more cinematic which i wanted to be like, if the video is not edited the tension wouldn’t be stronger and it wouldn’t look professionally.

Video Art Installation: REWIND “OVERVIEW”

I presented my installation in the class in a big screen this is because I wanted to show the class how effective the slow motion effect is when it comes to an action movements in a video. The slow motion looks great on a big screen because you can see how the action movements creates an exciting effect to the audience and it looks very intriguing how the actors movements looks robotic when its slow motion.

The music also goes well with it as i have to play the video and the music the same time, the music expands the excitement of it because how loud the speaker is that’s been built in the tv. The music i chose is called ‘go’ by the chemical brothers which links in with the story of chasing someone. The music is very weird having different types of bass, techno and beats having that 1980’s vibe into it.

The video and the music goes perfectly well together that it doesn’t matter if the beat is not cut into the video. The music makes it more exciting and makes the mood more strong in contrast with the video of the guy getting chased creating a thriller effect for the audience.

I had a lot of positive feedback of the videos getting questions about how i  made my slow motion effect, and how i created my story. I was very proud of this work because it’s very different and that is what’s this unit about that we can make anything whatever comes out in our brain.

Video Art installation IDEAS

My main plan is that I wanted to experiment the speed and duration of different videos that also has a story line into it. I want to experiment with rewinding videos from past to future, and have the story unfold at the end. I also want the videos to be in a slow motion so the viewers will see a lot of big gestures and facial expressions pretty well making an impact for the story.

Story: The story is going to be a guy who picked a wallet in a college corridor but as soon he picked it up the owners came out of nowhere looking for his wallet saw the guy picked it up. The guy got scared so he ran for his dear life getting chased by the owner. Until the chasing stop by the forest where eventually he got tripped and has no where to go leaving himself beaten up unconscious.

The video timeline it’s not going to be like this, it will start with the guy laying down the floor unconscious (present) and it will rewind of the chase until the point he picked up the wallet.

And then at the end i want a different scenarios, one where he picked the wallet and two where he didn’t picked the wallet. This gives a good message across to the audience that don’t ever steals someone’s belongings especially wallet because they might end up like the guy on this video.

Video Artist: Bruce Nauman “Pinch Neck”

Bruce Nauman (born December 6, 1941) is an American artist. His practice spans a broad range of media including sculpture, photography, neon, video, drawing, printmaking, and performance. Nauman lives near Galisteo, New Mexico.

Bruce Nauman is a contemporary artist who is well-known with his neon art works. He uses different materials to articulate his perspective such as; photography, light/neon, video, drawing and performance. Although they use it in a different manner, his way of using his face and the emphasis of a “speech” organ reminds me the Williamson’s video. About Nauman’s works, it can be stated that because the major and the only content of his artworks is his activities or experiences, they are not considered as a film or a video art, instead it is a document of an activity . Regarding to his use of face/body Nauman said he is using his body as a piece of material and manipulating it through his artworks.

Bruce Nauman
Bruce Nauman

“The idea of making faces had to do with thinking about the body as something you can manipulate. I had done some performance pieces – rigorous works dealing with standing, leaning, bending – and as they were performed, some of them seemed to carry a large emotional impact. I was very interested in that: if you perform a bunch of arbitrary operations, some people will make very strong connections with them and others won’t”

I got this quote from (click here)

The quotation above simply illustrates the Nauman’s perspective in making sense out of his artworks. Especially the last sentence, which points out “arbitrariness”, recalls the opposition between sensory motor reaction and critical thought. In Nauman’s work there is neither a dissociation or nor an association, instead there is a thing, which may refer to anything. I communicate with the video both through my sensory motor abilities and thinking patterns. It evokes a certain physical response, which irritates me a bit and on the other hand, it makes me think on how a simple survival activity, as to swallow, or distortion of body places in art. Nauman had various examples in this context; Slow Angle Walk (Beckett Walk) (1968) can be a good example for how “Nauman was able to alienate himself in a Beckettian manner from his arms and legs, so they seemed to have lives of their own, detached and objectified.”

Pinch Neck 

This video “Pinch Neck” 1968, by Bruce Nauman, “features close-cropped images of Bruce Nauman’s face framed by bridge of his nose to his Adam’s apple by the width of his face. Within this frame Nauman, using his fingers, pinches his lips; pulls his lower lip; pinches his cheeks, pulls his neck; and pulls his lips”. This framing is something that can make the viewer discouraged over the two minutes and will make them want to see the whole body and not a cropped form. This however is playing into the meaning of the video.

“Nauman is attempting to maintain a kind of abstraction while playing in certain kinds of tangible and commonplace subject matter, such as the referents of the statistics found so much in conceptualism”. Nauman could be seen as using his body as a prop. In the Willoughby Sharp article “Body Works,” it is stated that “The body as a prop is related to the use of the body as a backdrop in that the body is presented in relation to other physical objects. But here the body exists in an identifiable field, as one particular among other particulars.” Nauman is using his face as the prop and is using his hands as the other “particulars” in a way to create and stretch his body in to the afore mentioned abstract forms. This stretching, pulling and wrenching of the skin could be viewed as possibly painful and curious. The Element of endurance is once again up for debate.

Unit 27 Pre Production – Script Facts & Quotes

Regarding conditions in the tents:

I have learnt what rough life is, I shan’t know how to feel when I sleep in a bed again and have my meals off a table, after sleeping on the floor and having my blankets for a chair and my knees or the floor for a table. You would laugh to see us sitting round the tent, laughing and talking, all as happy as can be”. – Arthur Goodchild

Regarding the food whilst in the tents it at least seemed good:

‘We have hot sausages for breakfast, sometimes bacon.  We have hot beef and potatoes for dinner.  We have not had a cold dinner only once, and that was when we come from Ipswich.  We had some good cake last Sunday for tea, and I always have all the tea I can drink’

Arthur Goodchild

Regarding the improvement of the huts:

“I like the huts much better than tents, it’s a treat after what we have been used to and no mistake, it’s cleaner and dryer and more room and we can get our meals better, we can see out of the windows right across the sea, there are six windows in each and two doors”.  –Arthur Godchild

Work of the YMCA:

“As soon as the troops were in training the Association lost no time in pitching their large marquees, in which to cater for the social, spiritual, intellectual and moral welfare of the men in training.”

Worthing Gazette, 2nd December 1914

Canadian view of YMCA work when there in 1917 –

‘a glimpse of home and comfort for thousands of us who are alone in a strange country’,

Worthing Gazette, 18th July 1917

The Canadian mutiny as reported by Canadian A. Y. Jackson who was stationed in Shoreham Camp in 1917:

‘I arrived back in Shoreham just in time to get mixed up in a mutiny. The company of which I was a member refused to go on parade. The poor food and bullying by N.C.O.’s had been too much for us.’

[summary of following text – After presenting complaints to their Captain who said he was aware the food was rotten and had himself been complaining to the authorities but no attention was being paid. He said the complaint would now go to headquarters and the men went back on parade.]

Jackson, A. 1958. A Painters Country C anada: Clarke, Irwin & Company Ltd. p39.

Unit 27 Pre Production – Documentary Script

Morale & mutiny played a big role in the First World War; this was the only driving force the soldiers had. As part of the United Kingdom force, Shoreham Army Camp prepared soldiers to go join the worldwide war. Early stages of Shoreham camp the camp only consisted of tents & non-permanent stationary. Living conditions for the soldiers was not great; it was unprepared because of the sheer amount of soldiers. The small tents, of which the soldiers lived in, were made out of white canvas; this was designed to reflect the sun’s heat. But in the case of Shoreham camp, this was in the middle of November where the weather wasn’t suitable for the design of the tents. The weather was freezing cold & the rain caused the field they were living in, to turn into a muddy chaos.

This setup was a fail & was not popular with the approximately 19,000 soldiers who stationed there. This was because these tents were not weather resistance- they couldn’t resist high winds & also they were waterproof to a certain state. The soldiers also had to deal with leaking tents because of the horrible winter weather; this also caused the soldiers to be constantly cold. This made the soldiers living condition to decline to a state where the soldiers couldn’t live their daily lives without the fear of dirty clothing & their health conditions.

I have learnt what rough life is, I shan’t know how to feel when I sleep in a bed again and have my meals off a table, after sleeping on the floor and having my blankets for a chair and my knees or the floor for a table. You would laugh to see us sitting round the tent, laughing and talking, all as happy as can be”.

Arthur Goodchild

Due to the issues with living conditions, most of the soldiers at Shoreham Army Camp did not enjoy living & training in the conditions given. There were, however, some efforts to provide entertainments with concerts in the tents put on by local orchestras and reading materials offered. The soldiers were also excited for the hot food they’re giveneveryday.

‘We have hot sausages for breakfast, sometimes bacon.  We have hot beef and potatoes for dinner.  We have not had a cold dinner only once, and that was when we come from Ipswich.  We had some good cake last Sunday for tea, and I always have all the tea I can drink’

Arthur Goodchild

Following the winter According to the Goodchild brothers they were moved to huts temporarily in early December 1914 but they were not properly finished and the weather got so bad soldiers were sent to Shoreham, Worthing and Brighton to live with locals – called ‘billeting’. The majority of soldiers stayed in these billets with the locals until the huts were completed properly in March 1915. Only some returning before then to work on the camp roads.

1914/1915

These huts proved to be way better than the temporary tents in-place before. The huts were made out of wood & were actually able resist the harsh weather. These huts provide proper shelter for the soldiers, therefore they were getting good sleep and it was a nice & cosy place for them to keep warm. This improved the soldiers’ living condition a lot & boosted the soldiers’ morale. From there onwards the soldiers’ morale kept getting better & better, they had entertainment, activities & a good living quarter.

Some examples of the activities the soldiers got up to included visiting the local cinema where soldiers are able to watch films and socialise with the locals. A boxing match was also part of activities that made them feel more relief from the stress of the living condition in the camp. The soldiers was also able to participate in the boxing matches, this gave them a hands on experience of fighting the opposition.

­

There was also a YMCA (Young Men’s Christian Association), this is provided soldiers activities to do out of their own spare time. The YMCA provided the soldiers with religious and athletics activities. As part of the religious activities the soldiers were able to participate bibles studies, worship services and prayer meetings. They also had religious support from the YMCA this boosted the soldiers’ morale & also gave the soldiers hope when they go to war & also motivation to support each other’s back in the time of need.

As part of the YMCA, the soldiers were provided with alethic activities. These activities included football, rugby, running & also general exercising. The YMCA was a big success with the soldiers because it gave them time to disconnect themselves from the pressure & fear of the war. This made the soldiers’ mind & body fitter & more prepared for the war ahead. There were also lessons in the camp in French, German and first aid cookery. Musical entertainments, comedians and shows increased when the camp started to take in soldiers convalescing recovering from injuries.

When the war was over, the camp was still intact & operational. The government plan for demobilisation was drawn up in August 1917 – long before the end of the war.  The government’s aim was to avoid mass unemployment when the soldiers returned home. So the scheme they came up with was to release individual soldiers rather than whole units in accordance with the needs of industry – those with important jobs to go to would be demobbed first. This also affected the soldiers of Shoreham army camp; the scheme was highly unpopular with the troops as it seemed really unfair.

The soldiers wanted to go home to see their families- but weren’t officially allowed to. This led to the soldiers forming mutinies to protest against the authority. It was recorded in the Argus on the 6th of January 1919 that the soldiers of Shoreham & Southwick army camp decided to march to Brighton.

Around 4000-5000 soldiers from Shoreham army camp contributed to this march resulting in their voice being heard. This march was to Brighton hall; this was over 8 miles from the camp. The soldiers kept a good order & were singing the whole way. They marched to Brighton hall, where the mayor of Brighton was located. This resulted in the mayor of Brighton taking actions, he stated that he hoped things hurried up for them & added that he was glad that the protest was made so that the soldiers could receive the attention they needed. The soldiers were extremely satisfied with the mayor’s action; they went ahead and sang ‘for he’s a jolly good fellow’ & according to the report ‘re-formed fours & marched off on their return eight miles tramp’

Towards the end of 1919, the soldiers of Shoreham army camp slowly demobilised. It was a sluggish process but all of the soldiers that remained at the camp were able to return to their family & return to their normal lives.

UNIT 27 PRE-PRODUCTION – SCRIPT

Morale & mutiny played a big role in the war; this was the only driving force the soldiers had. As part of the United Kingdom force, Shoreham Army Camp prepared soldiers to go join the worldwide war. Early stages of Shoreham camp, the camp only consisted of tents & non-permanent stationary. Living conditions for the soldiers was not great; it was unprepared because of the sheer amount of soldiers. The soldiers had to sleep in small tents. The tents, of which the soldiers lived in, were made out of white canvas; this was designed to reflect the sun’s heat. But in the case of Shoreham camp, this was in the middle of November where the weather wasn’t suitable for the design of the tents. The weather was freezing cold & the rain caused the field they were living in, to turn into a muddy chaos.

This setup was a fail & was not popular with the approximately 19,000 soldiers who stationed there. This was because these tents were not weather resistance- they couldn’t resist high winds & also they were waterproof to a certain state. The soldiers also had to deal with leaking tents because of the horrible winter weather; this also caused the soldiers to be constantly cold. This made the soldiers living condition to decline to a state where the soldiers couldn’t live their daily lives without the fear of dirty clothing & their health conditions.

Due to the issues with living conditions, most of the soldiers at Shoreham Army Camp did not enjoy living & training in the conditions given. These conditions caused the soldiers’ morale to deplete & made the soldiers want to do something about it either by protesting or wanting to leave.

Following the winter of 1914/1915 that caused huge mudslides in the camp, the tents were replaced, by hutment accommodations. These huts proved to be way better than the temporary tents in-place before. The huts were made out of wood & were actually able resist the harsh weather. These huts provide proper shelter for the soldiers, therefore they were getting good sleep and it was a nice & warm place for them to keep warm. This improved the soldiers’ living condition a lot & boosted the soldiers’ morale. From there onwards the soldiers’ morale kept getting better & better, they had entertainment, activities & a good living quarter.

Some examples of the activities the soldiers got up to included visiting the local cinema, watching boxing match & they also had a YMCA to visit

When the war was over, the camp was still intact & operational. The soldiers on the other hand wanted to go home to see their families- but weren’t officially allowed to. This led to the soldiers forming mutinies to protest against the authority. It was recorded in the Argus on the 6th of January 1919 that the soldiers of Shoreham & Southwick army camp decided to march to Brighton.

Around 4000-5000 soldiers contributed to this march resulting in their voice being heard. This march was to Brighton hall; this was over 8 miles from the camp. The soldiers kept a good order & were singing the whole way & they kept this up for the whole walk. They marched to Brighton hall, where the mayor of Brighton was located. This resulted in the mayor of Brighton taking actions, he stated that he hoped that things hurried up for them & added that he was glad that the protest was made so that the soldiers could receive the attention they needed. The soldiers were extremely satisfied with the mayor’s action; they went ahead and sang ‘for he’s a jolly good fellow’ & according to the report ‘re-formed fours & marched off on their return eight miles tramp’